So Easy A Fourth Grader Can Do It

I've been baking with my kids since they were tall enough to reach the counter (while standing on a stool). We bake everything from cookies and cakes, to brownies and pies. My kids are very comfortable in the kitchen, and bake on their own a lot now. Last week, was "Take Your Daughter To Work Day", so that's what I did. Not only did I take her to work, but I also put her to work--making chocolates! Making chocolates really is a simple activity that you can do with kids. It's actually easier than baking, and the results are delicious. While my daughter was making chocolates, I took pictures to show you how easy it is. Of course, she couldn't decide on which mold to use, so as you can see, we used all of them! Lucky girl!
 
Making Chocolates
 
 
A confectionery funnel is not required, but it sure makes the process easier.
 
Tools Needed
Silicone chocolate mold (Fat Daddio's SCM)
Confectioners funnel (Fat Daddio's CF-01). Of course you can use a ladle, but trust me this is the simplest and neatest way to fill the molds.
Straight-sided spatula (Fat Daddio's SPAT). 
Double-boiler (sauce pan, filled with water and a bowl on top)
1 pound melting chocolate discs/wafers
 
Using Silicone Chocolate Molds
 

  1. Melt chocolate in a double-boiler, stirring constantly. Melt until the chocolate is smooth and lump free.
  2. Pour melted chocolate into confectionery funnel. (I poured the hot melted chocolate into the funnel for safety reasons.) The great thing about the funnel, is it's tempered plastic will hold the chocolate's heat and allow you to work unhurriedly. Easy enough for a child to manage. The stainless steel piston allows for fast and accurate portioning. If you over fill, just scrap off additional chocolate with spatula.
     
  3. Allow chocolate to set on the counter (about 15 minutes) or in the refrigerator for 5 minutes).

     

  4. Once chocolate has hardened, (it will separate from the mold) push the bottom of the mold and the chocolate will pop out.
 
One pound of chocolate produced 36 different shapes and sizes of chocolate pieces. (And mother-daughter memories!)
 
 For more inspiration, visit our CHOCOLATE & Truffles board on Pinterest.